New to Snowshoeing Series, Part 2: Training Your Way to a Happy Day

Photo credit Jill Bethany

This article is the second part in our “New to Snowshoeing” series. (If you missed part 1, you can find it here.) But it isn’t just for people who are new to snowshoeing; these tips are also great for snowshoers who are looking to tackle a new goal such as summiting a major peak or running a race.

In this chapter we’ll be discussing training.


When a lot of us think of “training” we think of logging tons of volume in the end-goal activity: hiking, running, swimming, biking, lifting weights. However, our Atlas Athletes will be the first to tell you that a winter training mentality is very different from a summer training mentality.

With winter comes more obstacles:

  1. Motivation/Commitment: Addressed in Part 1.
  2. That Temperature: Having the right gear to combat extremely cold weather is extremely important.
  3. Safety: Snow and ice are slippery, there are less daylight hours, and much less visibility.
  4. Physical Challenges: It’s harder to work your muscles when they’re cold or when you’re coming from an “off season” regime of eating gingerbread men and watching “A Christmas Story” marathon.

But have no fear, we have tips to address all these obstacles!

First: Mental Training

Pro Tip: When we asked Team Atlas how they train different in the summer versus winter, a lot of them gave mental training tips. First and foremost: HAVE PATIENCE, both long-term and short-term.

First, have patience with your body. It takes longer for muscles to warm up and get used to moving in the cold, on snow, and with shoes that aren’t worn everyday. Cold temperatures can also cause your body to fatigue quicker.

Second, have patience with your mind. It’s hard for the brain to adjust to thoughts of “Oh, I’m going slower,” or “Wow I’m more tired than normal.” Try to stay positive and alert. This is supposed to be fun after all!

Second: Preparing Your Body

Whether you’re training for a snowshoe run or a larger hike, your body will go through some physical changes (we want to challenge ourselves, right?). Snowshoeing is great cross-training if you normally participate in other activities, but you can cross-train for snowshoeing too!

Atlas is an outdoor company, but we understand the gym has a place in our lives. Sometimes the weather is simply too bad to be outside, or we need a mental break, or we don’t have time to drive to the hills. That’s okay!

Pro Tip: If your day involves the gym, make the most of it. Join a class to spice things up. Use the stairclimber to mimic uphills. Use the treadmill for speed workouts or hill repeats. Strength train your WHOLE body, not just your legs. Strengthening your core and upper body help you stay balanced, keep your form, and prevent fatigue.

Additional Pro Tip: You can also use the ramp of a parking garage or the stairs in a tall building to work the climbing muscles in your legs.

Third: Getting On The Snow

Pro Tip: If you are taking it to the snow, make sure you include a longer-than-average warm up. You don’t want to pull a muscle on the way up, or tire yourself out too early.

All of these short bursts of strength and speed indoors will help you obtain your snowshoe goals outside, even if they’re endurance-based. Going uphill, even a small hill, is no joke if your body is already tired.

Pro Tip: Don’t forget that what goes up must come down. If you reach the peak and you’ve completely wiped yourself out, it’s not fun using those same muscles to get back down. Plan for your whole day, not just the peak! That includes saving some muscle and mental energy to get yourself home safely. It also means fueling your body properly, which we’ll discuss in Part 3.

Photo Credit: Tim Hola, Atlas Athlete
Photo Credit: Tim Hola, Atlas Athlete