Category Archives: Inspiration

Getting Off the Beaten Path on Mt. Hood

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Photo Credit Jamie Mieras
Photo Credit Jamie Mieras

By Adam Chase, Atlas Team Captain

Even though Mt. Hood is just a 90-minute drive from downtown Portland and considered PDX’s playground, the amount of snow the upper regions of the volcanic and glacial mountain receives keeps the hoards away, leaving its open wilderness and National Forest areas wide open for exploration.

You can gain serious elevation by starting from Timberline Lodge, a beautiful 1937, Depression-era Work Projects Administration structure six miles up the access road from the town of Government Camp. Climber’s Trail is an obvious option for those wanting to head directly toward the rather daunting yet alluring summit. In other words, it goes straight up the mountain. The going isn’t easy but the views earned from ascending with every step are well worth the effort. Timberline Lodge sits at 6,000 feet above sea level while the summit of Mt. Hood is at 11,245 with the terrain getting rather technical above 9,500.

We did a four-mile out-and-back on snowshoes on a mostly sunny yet breezy day with temps in the high 30s and low 40s. It took more than 90 minutes to ascend 2,500 feet and less than 30 minutes to descend on the soft snow. We saw skiers and boarders who took two lifts to get to just above our turnaround point and plenty of climbers who were headed to make a Saturday night high camp before going for an early Sunday summit and the return home.

Unless the temperature is just right, you’ll need snowshoes, skis with skins, crampons or other traction device and maybe an ice axe or poles. It is a great calf workout and for those coming from sea level the altitude is sure to get the heart and lungs pumping hard.

It was tempting to turn around to check out the view of Portland, below, as the views were spectacular. But we were less than 3,000 feet from the top of the peak that is marveled at regularly by Portlanders, the way Seattle residents are in awe of Mt. Rainier. The ridge line of the summit and its snow- and ice-encrusted crown, like a white saw against the blue sky it cut with its teeth, is so compelling.

 

Design Your Dream Snowshoe

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Ever wanted to sit in the chair of one of the Atlas snowshoe engineers? Well now’s your chance! (Not literally. Sorry folks. They need their chairs.)

We want to have a little winter fun and let you–our very knowledgeable and devoted snowshoe fans–design the most awesome snowshoe you can think of.

The rules are, there are no rules. Aim for the sky! No really, do you want flying snowshoes? Design what you would love to see in a snowshoe. Drawings and photos are encouraged. Be as crazy as you want to be. We want to see your creativity!

The best design will win a pair of existing Atlas snowshoes (sorry, we wish we could build your dream. Maybe one day.)

We lied, there are a few rules:

  1. This is a “dream” snowshoe. Entries will not actually be built.
  2. Contest will run until January 12.
  3. A single winner will be notified directly.
  4. Entries should be sent to:  marketing-web@atlassnowshoe.com
  5. By entering the contest you give us permission to post your submission to our social media accounts (with credit of course!) after the contest is complete. We will be posting the top designs and the winner.
  6. Multiple entries are welcome.

Hiking with Elektra

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You might know of the many different iterations of Elektra (or Electra depending on your mythology of preference): Marvel super hero, Sophacles’ heroine, Freudian complex. As one of the most popular mythological (and comic book) characters, Elektra is recognized as a strong and resilient female character.

So it’s no wonder that, in the early 2000’s, Atlas engineers decided to build a line of female-specific snowshoes, and name it after her. (Not to mention the earlier Electra was one of the seven daughters of the Titan Atlas, but enough with the history lessons!)

When we talk about our female-specific snowshoes, we don’t just mean a change in color. The reason we don’t call the line “Atlas Women’s Snowshoes” is because it is, physically, a different shoe from the men’s, and therefore deserved its own name and design.

Men's Montane
Men’s Montane
Elektra Montane
Elektra Montane

Elektra snowshoes are designed with a woman’s anatomy in mind. While studying the way women move, researchers note that women often have a narrower gait than men. Therefore, we needed to make snowshoes that allowed for that narrower step, specifically in the tail of the shoe (see our comparison above). When women are forced to walk in wider snowshoes, they’re going to expend more energy (try walking wider than is natural to you for a while, you’ll probably tire a lot faster). Therefore, a narrower shoe isn’t just necessary because of the weight factor, it actually helps the wearer save energy.

With snow starting to fall, now is the time to get yourself on the right snowshoes, built for you. Check out our Elektra line and see if it makes a difference on your hikes.

 

An Ode to the Local Shop

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Oh, Mom & Pop Shop!

Thank you for being you.

You support our adventures. You don’t laugh when we walk into your store and tell you our dreams. You hi-five us and lend us advice.

Thank you for being you.

You empathize with us. We share stories of victorious climbs, and commiserate when a goal goes unreached. You encourage us to keep moving.

Thank you for being you.

You educate us. When we don’t know what gear to bring, or want advice on your favorite products, you provide the guidance we need to begin our journey outside of the store’s walls.

Thank you for being you.

You bring us together. Be it the local community or connecting us to outdoor enthusiasts across the globe. You work long hours putting on events, giving us advice, teaching new skills, keeping us safe on our journeys, and bringing together new friends.

Thank you for being you.

Signed,

The Atlas Snow-Shoe Company

We encourage everyone to shop local this holiday season. Your local Atlas dealers can be found on our homepage. These dealers are leaders in your outdoor community and we are proud to direct you to them for your purchase needs, customer service, advice, or just to have a community of like-minded enthusiasts. Happy shopping everyone!

 

 

History 101: Snowshoes

From our sister site, snowshoes.com

From Europe to North America to Asia, people began using snowshoes over 4,000 years ago out of a basic need to explore new territories and to find food in the winter. With vast regions of the world snowbound for much of the year, hunters looked to emulate successful winter travelers like the snowshoe hare, whose oversized feet enabled them to move quickly over deep snow. In areas like central Europe, historians have discovered snowshoe-like tools, with the use of large leather flats and round wooden blocks, but the traditional webbed snowshoe design was developed and thrived with Native Americans.

The great success of snowshoes for winter travel was first observed by European explorers with Northeastern tribes such as the Huron and Algonquin, which led subsequent trappers, hunters, and surveyors to adopt snowshoes as their own. Some of the earliest snowshoes were over 7 feet long which, though unwieldy, were helpful in navigating through very deep, powdery snow. Snowshoers looked to the naturally efficient design of animal paws and began modeling their snowshoes after animal prints they found in nature. The popular “beavertail” style had a round nose with the ends coming together in a long tail. The “bearpaw” was short and wide with a round tail, as its name implies. Both styles have had enormous influence on modern snowshoe design.

Snowshoes.com | Origin of Snowshoeing

While the length and width of snowshoes varied over the years, they were typically large, made with ash timber frames and untanned cowhide webbing. The cultural landscape shifted dramatically approaching the early 1900s, as cities grew and society shifted from farming to industrial culture. People who no longer had to trap or hunt for food began to take to the woods for pure enjoyment and exercise, and the recreational sport of snowshoeing was born. In places like Quebec, recreational clubs held races and hosted hikes for recreational snowshoers, and new designs helped expand the market. Snowshoes became more than simply utilitarian, and with recreational use they became appreciated as aesthetic objects and pinnacles of craft.

Snowshoes.com | Tubbs Snowshoes Factory, Maine

Manufacturers like Tubbs Snowshoes, established in 1906, seized on the shift to recreational winter sports, building skis and snowshoe designs. Later on, as they developed smaller snowshoes using traditional constructions like the revolutionary 1950s Green Mountain Bearpaw, they made winter walking easier for the growing population. It wasn’t until the early 1970s that snowshoe design would radically change again. With the burgeoning back to nature movement, backcountry explorers looked to snowshoes to travel deeper into the mountains. These new designs featured new materials like aluminum frames and nylon decks, with smaller sizes and cleats underfoot for use in mountaineering and more rugged terrain. The eventual products, led by companies like Sherpa Snowshoes, introduced the world to the “Western” style snowshoe.

Snowshoes.com | Modern Snowshoeing Alum-a-shoe

 

Eventually the Western style snowshoe construction became the norm, replacing traditional wood and rawhide constructions with smaller designs that offered equal flotation and better traction through solid decks and aluminum cleats. Those designs would be further refined in decades to come with introductions like Atlas Snow-Shoe Company’s revolutionary binding suspension system and dual toe and heel traction in 1990. With great advances in lighter, durable materials and more compact, athletic shapes, snowshoes spurred a renewed interest the sport, expanding it to new markets with backpackers, hikers, runners, families and more.

Snowshoes.com | Modern Snowshoeing Atlas 2006 Men's 12Series

Today, snowshoeing has never been more popular, with roughly 5.5 million participants in the United States alone. Easy, accessible snowshoes have opened up a whole new world of winter, from snowshoe trail centers at ski areas and local parks to quiet hiking trails and distant snow-capped peaks with incredible vistas. Snowshoeing has come a long way from its early designs and uses, but there’s never been a better time to explore winter.

Interested in the history of Atlas specifically? Read this post from earlier this year!

 

Meet The Team

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We here at Atlas Snow-Shoe Company feel incredibly lucky to have people who love our product. Our engineers spend years working on perfecting something as large as a crampon and as small as a buckle, and it’s pretty cool to see our fans out in the real world using the snowshoes to tackle a mountain, a race, or a family hike.

The benefit and the drawback of outdoor adventuring is that it’s often done in less-populated, quiet, areas. We want to show how much fun everyone is having on their snowshoes, but it’s hard sometimes! That’s where our ambassadors come in.

We are happy to announce our 2017/2018 Atlas Athlete Team. We received a LOT of applications to join this adventure and racing team. Our ambassadors reach far beyond this group; we welcome everyone to continue getting out there and sharing your adventures with us by tagging us on social @atlassnowshoes.

The Atlas Team represents people of all ages, geographic areas, skill levels, and they all have different goals for the next winter. Follow them on our blog, and on our social (@atlassnowshoes), to see where their snowshoes will take them.

Meet the Team

Adventure On Atlas Fans!

#Inspiration

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Looking for a little push to get you through the hottest days of summer?

As a gift from us to you, here’s a list of some* of our favorite social media accounts and websites that keep us inspired–as people and as a brand.

*SOME….just some…as in, not all.

  Outside Magazine Whether it’s educational, current events, or just drool-worthy photos, the online version of Outside Magazine has got it all. We always look forward to their Gear Guides and Annual Best Towns (hello, we’re headquartered in Seattle!), but you’ll never be bored reading their adventure stories or learning how to cook a 7 course meal while car camping. Their Instagram account is a who’s who of incredible places, think–a yearbook of the world’s best adventures.


The Mountaineers

If you’re looking for a Non-Profit that covers it all, The Mountaineers’ Instagram will inspire you to get out, educate, advocate, and help others in your community to do the same. Itching to get involved? Their website has a lot of ways to help.

A post shared by Michael DiTullo (@d2lo) on

Michael DiTullo The opening line of his “About me” says it all: “People don’t have Picassos, they have stuff”.

  A post shared by Outdoor Project (@outdoorproject) on

  Outdoor Project Outdoor Project is a little bit of everything: a resource for travel, maps and field guides, a social community that allows you to share your adventures, a blog with posts ranging from “Day Float Essentials” to “Protect Your Public Lands: A User’s Guide”. Their Facebook page highlights these educational, and timely, articles while their Instagram account showcases some of the site’s best and most inspiring photography.

Wilderness Culture Wilderness Culture is an Instagram account intended to “inspire your next outdoor adventure”. Not only is the photography beautiful, but we love that they support anyone and everyone (professional photographer to amateur). All you need to do is tag #wildernessculture and you could see your images on their feed!

  A post shared by tentree (@tentree) on

tentree If you don’t know tentree, start getting to know them. While it’s technically an apparel company, they’re also a group of do-gooders (“ten trees” planted for every item purchased…hence the name). Even better, their Instagram account is a collection of beautiful photography, sometimes showcasing their product, but more often not.

Camp4Collective Their “About” section on Facebook: Creativity in Motion for The Outdoor World. Translation: incredible films, even more incredible imagery, and inspiring story telling from the outdoor front-lines. Warning: their YouTube channel might take you away from work for a few days. Better call in sick now.

Lululemonlabvyr Wait…what? Yes we follow apparel and fashion accounts because we are, in fact, a technology and design company. This Instagram account is much more than yoga pants and sports bras. The “lab” version, based in the company’s hometown of Vancouver, highlights the fashion and technology concepts that aren’t of the traditional-Lulu variety. Plus, the product photography is stellar.

A post shared by Play-Doh (@playdoh) on

Play-Doh

Because we like to party.

As you get out there on epic adventures, tag us #atlassnowshoes or @atlassnowshoes for a chance to be featured on our social accounts.