Category Archives: Youth Education

Spring Skills: Tips for Hiking on Late-Season Snow

It may be spring, but there’s still snow in many places across the globe! If you have the luxury of late season snow access, you should take advantage of it, but know that there are factors you need to consider to stay safe.

Thank you to our friends at the Washington Trails Association for highlighting this list from Mountaineering Educator Mike Zawaski.

Snow travel: a good skill to add to your backpack

  • A snowy pass can provide a significant and dangerous obstacle for the unprepared hiker traveling in the high country. Even if you don’t aspire to climbing peaks, it is definitely worth your time to learn how to kick good steps and travel with an ice ax.

Hiking on snow can reduce your impact

  • Having the confidence to travel on snow allows you reduce your impact by walking on snow instead of around it, a practice which can create additional trails and destroy vegetation.

Travel on firm snow reduces risk from avalanches

  • Late spring and early summer can be a great time to climb snowy routes on peaks, but avalanches are still a hazard. Reduce your chances of getting caught in an avalanche by climbing and descending your route while the snow is still firm. For east-facing routes, this may mean completing much of your ascent before sunrise.

Look ahead to spot hazardous transition zones

  • Common places where falls occur are transition zones. These are places where the terrain or characteristics of the snow changes and climbers fall because they fail to adjust their equipment or technique. Avoid these hazards by looking ahead and preparing for changes before you encounter them. For example it may be much easier to put on your crampons on a low angle section instead of waiting until you are starting to slip because the snow is too steep or too firm.

How to kick steps in snow

  • Learn all about safe snow travel with Mike Zawaski's award-winning book. Photo courtesy National Outdoor Book Awards. Kicking steps with your feet is more complex than most books make it seem. The two tips I commonly offer are to 1.) choose the step that gets the most of your boot’s sole in contact with the snow (if you’re worried about falling) and 2.) not to tiptoe around when kicking hard-firm snow.

Old footsteps can be icy: you may be better kicking your own steps

  • Beware of following an old set of footsteps across a snowy slope. These may be very icy, especially on a cold morning. If you are proficient kicking steps you are much more likely to find a better route or travel more safely across pre-existing steps.

Getting technical: crampons, ice axes and rope teams

  • While ski poles or trekking poles may help you maintain balance while kicking steps across a slope, an ice ax is superior for helping you self-arrest if you fall. Self-arresting with ski poles is possible, but it is much more difficult and you will slide further than if you are using an ice ax.

Crampons: only to be used on firm snow and ice

  • Crampons are an amazing tool that give your feet traction, but they should only be used on very firm snow and ice. The danger on soft snow is that snow will build up under your boot so that your points fail to stick which may cause you to fall.

To learn more about kicking steps, using crampons, and using an ice ax for going up, traversing, resting, and descending on snow, check out Mike Zawaski’s Snow Travel: Climbing, Hiking, and Crossing Over Snow.

Making an Impact

 

In a recent post we discussed our impressions of the Outdoor Retailer tradeshow; mainly one of inspiration at how the industry is working together to get more people outside (to put it simply).

Atlas Snow-Shoe Company has always been driven to get snowshoes into more hands, and get others out enjoying their winter playground. We partner with incredible non-profits, events, and resorts, who share our passion for the outdoors.

Here, we’re highlighting our Atlas Athletes, aka our ambassadors, and all the good they do for their communities. It takes a village to achieve our goals, and we’re thankful that we have these ambassadors not just to our brand or the sport, but to serving those in need.

Adam Chase, Atlas Team Captain

adam and nancy hobbs

I’ve served as the President of the American Trail Running Association for just over 20 years and, in that capacity, have worked on a number of snowshoe-related matters, access to trails, trail safety and etiquette, and how the mountain, ultra and trail running communities may be best served. ATRA deals with maximizing the quantity and quality of trails in the US and reaches out to like minded organizations for cooperative alliances that nuture environmental protection, education, recreational participation, and supports elite trail runners and snowshoers.

For example, ATRA works closely with the US Snowshoe Associaton (USSSA) where I’m a volunteer of the governing body-and trail running-related businesses. ATRA’s race calendar, which includes many snowshoes races, is likely the most visited event page for trail runners.

Geoff Roes, Atlas Athlete

team alaska snowshoe running

The Arctic Winter Games, which began in 1970 and takes place every two years, are a collection of athletic competitions for northern nations and cultures from around the world. This year’s games will be taking place next month in Hay River, YT, Canada. This is essentially the Junior Olympics for people of the far north.

For the last couple months I have been working with a group of athletes who will be representing Team Alaska in the snowshoe events. We have largely been focusing on improving their overall speed and fitness, but many of the kids have never really done much snowshoeing before so a lot of the focus is simply on getting them comfortable on the shoes. This is especially challenging considering that for the competitions at the games they are required to wear traditional wooden snowshoes with fully natural fiber bindings and footwear. Lamp wicking and Mukluks being the gear of choice.

More than anything though we encourage them to get out and simply enjoy being outside moving their bodies in a healthy and encouraging environment. With this in mind, many of our practices lately have consisted of strapping on our snowshoes and going out into the mountains for several hours simply to share this time together and see what we see. Do these outings make them stronger athletes even though they are very different than what they will be doing at the games and there’s not much focus on pace or distance or technique? Absolutely. More importantly though, they teach them how satisfying and worthwhile it can be to get out and have fun doing something healthy, while really just playing around in the snow with friends. This isn’t something I quite understood when I was their age (13-17), but in being a firm believer in the value of this now, it feels really exciting to me to be able to pass this on to them.

Sarah McMahan, Atlas Athlete

When I was in elementary school I had physical education class every day.  Kids need exercise to get their wiggles out, refocus, and prepare the brain to learn.  So it’s shocking to me that today many elementary schools don’t get funding for a PE teacher, which is the case at the elementary school where my kids go.

In 2016 myself and other concerned parents created the Physical Education and Wellness non-profit organization for Incline Elementary School.  Our goal is to raise funds to support a full-time PE teach and wellness programs at the school.  Fundraising efforts include and annual jogathon, 5k color run, raffles, and anything needed to pay for various programs.  In addition to the PE teacher, we provide a Harvest of the Month program introducing fruits and vegetables and healthy eating, free fluoride dental treatments, and before and after school athletic activities.  Winter acitivities include snowshoeing and nordic skiing for the kids.

Teaching kids at a young age to be active and healthy is both fun and rewarding.

Thank you to all of our Atlas fans for supporting outdoor and health initiatives. If you volunteer, support, or are involved in an important non-profit, make sure you share it with us!

Field Notes: Get Outdoors Leadville!

Atlas Snow-Shoe Company is a proud supporter of the Outdoors Empowered Network which is committed to “growing a powerful network of affiliates that get youth outdoors through wilderness leadership training and outdoor gear libraries”. OEN has a national reach and is committed to getting more kids out and enjoying winter snowsports, same as us!

Below, read about one of their chapters and feel the snowshoe love!

Interested in getting involved with OEN? Learn about their leadership trainings here.

GOL outdoor school

Field Notes

Snow season has finally arrived to stay, and we couldn’t be more excited to get kids out playing in it! Seeing so many youth out on skis, snowshoes, and fat bikes is awesome! While we’re deep in winter mode right now, we’re also looking forward to all the summer programming just over the horizon. Check out below for more info on summer activities and recruitment events for youth pathways. Summer programs registration and pathways applications will open in March.

As GOL! embarks on our second year of work, we want to invite community leadership and guidance through a formal Advisory Board. This group will help GOL! fulfill our strategic plan and keep our commitment to serve the desires of our diverse community. Please consider whether you or someone you know could help provide vision and leadership in this role.

We are also excited to dive headfirst into planning with CMC for the community Gear Library! We will have community focus groups and design charrettes in the coming weeks so everyone has a chance to share their ideas and insights. Dates and details will be shared out just as soon as they’re set.Happy trails,

–the GOL! Team

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

Winterpalooza

Thank you to all who attended this month’s Winterpalooza workshops! It’s inspiring to share in your enthusiasm for getting kids outdoors. GOL! Is thrilled to have the Gear Library open now for youth-serving organizations and program providers. With 80 pairs of youth snowshoes, 23 fat bikes, 40 pairs of Nordic skis, and a cadre of newly trained leaders, our youth have so many new opportunities to get out and enjoy the winter wonderland in which we live.

It’s great to see Project Dream’s GOL! Adventure Clubs and PE teacher Christian Lovely already regularly using the gear with students! Still more educators — like Roxie Aldaz and Michelle Cavanaugh — are getting their classes outside frequently too!

GOL adventure days

GOL! Adventure Days

Almost 70 students joined 10 GOL! leaders for a memorable day of Nordic and downhill skiing, snowshoeing, sledding, and snow games up at Ski Cooper and ice skating at Huck Finn on Friday, January 26th. Even though temps were low, spirits were high!

Huge thanks to Ski Cooper, Tennessee Pass Nordic Center, guest Nordic instructor Malin Bengtsson, Lake County Recreation Department, and Lake County School District transportation and food services for supporting the activities. Kudos to all the kids and crew leaders who made it such a blast; whether they were trying downhill skiing for the very first time ever, shredding all day on the backside, or taking over the Nordic Center trails and ice rink, everyone enjoyed a full day of snowy outdoor fun!

GOL!-LCSD

A new semester of Wilderness Experience kicked off at CMC on January 11th with a cohort of 12 students who are earning college credit and high school credit (a dual-enrollment course!) through the course. These students are gaining practical outdoor skills as they also develop leadership, community skills, and resilience. So far, they’ve cooked on Whisperlite stoves, taken on some challenging team building initiatives, and learned about thermoregulation including the pros and cons of different materials for preventing heat loss. GOL!’s gear library has helped outfit them for the semester – so they’re sporting everything from shiny new Keen hiking boots to Columbia long underwear to Madden packs courtesy of Colorado Outward Bound School and Patagonia puffies donated to the library by HMI! We’re really excited about learning and adventuring with this great group of students this semester!

OLT Celebration Day

On Thursday, January 25th, the students at Lake County Intermediate School (LCIS) got the best type of reward: playing in the snow! This reward, dubbed “Snowpalooza” by the LCIS staff, was to honor the strong work these students did during quarter 2 to develop their perseverance, one of LCIS’s “Habits of a Learner.”

“Snowpalooza” included Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, and snow play/snacks. GOL!-trained teachers and guest instructors oversaw the gear borrowing process and facilitated each station. Susan Fishman, a volunteer GOL!-trained leader, led Nordic skiing and said it was a “hoot.” “There was lots of laughter because I told them that was a rule when they fall,” Susan explained.

This was the first large-scale use (about 200 kids got out!) of the gear from the Gear Library since GOL! implemented trainings and formalized borrowing procedures. We’re excited that the gear is getting kids out trying new outdoor activities! Thanks to LCIS staff for this awesome idea!

GOL gear library

The GOL! Community Gear Library Updates

The many dreams and visions developed over the past 2+ years are finally starting to take shape as GOL! works with Colorado Mountain College on preliminary design ideas for the GOL! community Gear Library. The facility will be an annex to the CMC Climax building, complementing the CMC student gear library space already in place, with easy access to the great CMC campus trails. We will facilitate community focus groups and design charrettes in the coming weeks so everyone has a chance to share their ideas and insights. Dates and details will be shared out just as soon as they’re set. It’s so exciting the GOL! gear will have a permanent home where all can access and enjoy it!

Let’s Rock 2018

Now that we’re fairly settled into the new year, snow is (hopefully) falling for most of you, and we’ve gotten past the “resolution rush”, now is a great time to start thinking about, or remind ourselves of, what we want to accomplish in 2018.

For a little bit of inspiration, we’ve turned to our incredible Atlas Athletes, who are sharing their stories, their motivations, and their goals this year.

Brandy

I use snowshoe running to get in shape for my summer of mountain/trail running! If I get the opportunity to travel to Snowshoe Nationals, my goal will be to make the National Snowshoe Team by placing in the top 5 and also finish as the 1st master’s runner.

As for my summer racing goals, they are a work in progress. My two main focuses right now are the Mt. Washington Road Race & trying to make the US Long Distance Mountain Running team to compete at the Long Distance World Championships in Poland in June. If selected, my goal will be to place in the top 10.

My goals for Mt. Washington are:

1) Finish in the top 3 women.

2) Run a post-baby PR.

3) Break the Master’s record.

To obtain these goals, I am currently working on weaning Zeke, getting him to sleep through the night and build a huge aerobic base. Lack of sleep definitely affects one’s training.  We moved to Summit County this past summer. I live near Keystone resort which allows uphill running/snowshoe access. I’ve been using this “hill” to build my strength and endurance. My goal is to run up the mountain at least 3 times a week!

Other goals I have for this summer,

1) Compete in at least one new race.

2) I’d also like to compete in one new or longer distance race this fall.

A few general tips I have for goal setting:

1) Be specific and make your goals measurable.

2) Be realistic with where you are at right now and set smaller goals to help you reach your ultimate goals.

3) Use your goals as motivation on the days you struggle to get out of bed or out the door.

4) Enjoy the process/journey of training for your goals regardless of the outcome.

5) Be grateful for the gift of health!

Colleen

My entire focus for this year is being able to show up at the start line in Silverton Colorado for the Hard Rock 100.  I am fortunate to get a second chance at a  race I’ve been gunning for for years. It certainly will not be a podium finish.     I made it in last year and tore my ACL and Meniscus in a training race.  It’s been a difficult journey back.  It’s a hard injury to come back from at  any age and even more so at my age.  I struggle with doubt and uncertainty but mostly the unknown.  I hope I am doing what I should be doing.  I’ll be pushing to the max when technically I should ” just about be back to normal”   I question when to push when to rest.  I lack trust in my body which is a new sensation and scary.  I am tentative which I deplore, but this is a new journey and goal is to continue to learn and grow and finish!!

Emily

My goals for 2018 all focus around training smarter. As an injury-prone athlete, I want to make the most of each run and minimize the risk factors leading towards overuse injuries. In order to train smarter, I have significantly decreased my mileage during the winter. This allows for harder, more goal-oriented workouts, more time and energy for snowshoeing, and several cross-training classes a week to equalize any muscle imbalances. Once marathon training rolls around in the spring, I will slowly amp up mileage with the added benefit of a solid base of speed and strength. I think making it through a training season without injury is 75% of the battle in reaching your goals. If I can make it to the start line uninjured, my other goals will follow.

Geoffrey

Over the past few years my goals have moved somewhat away from my personal experiences in the outdoors, and closer to a desire to find as many ways as possible to help others experience the pleasure and nourishment from moving their bodies through wild and scenic places. This winter I have begun to work more closely with a group of kids here in Juneau, Alaska who are trying out for the upcoming Arctic Winter Games snowshoe events. For the remainder of this winter, and for years to come I hope to be able to continue to work with others to teach them any skills, tips, and experiences that I have gathered along the way in my athletic career. These experiences working with others have become the most satisfying part of being an athlete, and the thing I most look forward to going forward.

geoffrey kids snowshoe

Jake

Personally, I am not motivated by a single race, event or activity on a fixed day or even over a specific period of time, as my main goal for my athletic pursuits is to continue to become a better all around endurance athlete through diversity in a variety of sports and more integration into my everyday life.  That’s not to say that I don’t want to race or compete, I certainly like to push myself, my focus is just more on competing within and finding new ways to improve and enjoy the outdoors in unique ways through multi-sport endeavors.  An example that comes to mind from the past was about 7 years ago, when I couldn’t even legitimately swim a single freestyle lap in the pool, and now I occasionally, and confidently, participate in 2+ mile open water swim events for fun.  I’m also attempting to pickup skate skiing this winter, which seems much harder than the classic skiing I’m used to from the couple times I’ve been out briefly, but the lack of snow this year has not been very helpful in supporting that effort.

Most front of mind for me in the coming months and year, is to mitigate running related injuries by continuing to integrate more strength and mobility work, and being smarter about identifying potential issues and addressing them before it’s too late. 

Additionally, I’d like to do more on the bikes this coming year, including a gravel event (signed up for one in April), a CX race and generally just becoming a better mountain biker, and maybe trying to do some climbing and bouldering outside of the gym.  Beyond the athletic related pursuits, I hope to travel and camp more this coming year and spend more casual time on the water (fly fishing and paddling); ideally also integrating some travel, adventure and racing across the various pursuits, whether it’s on the snowshoes, trail running or on the bikes, just getting outdoors and having self-propelled fun.      

Jake training

 

Karen

At 43, I am not sure I am going to get much faster then the times I ran in early to mid thirties! So this year I will lead a healthier life, give back more and be grateful for each day that I have. My sister had a unexpected double lung transplant this past June which put ideals for our family back in perspective.  Instead of getting frustrated that maybe I didn’t get enough workouts in, or woke up not feeling well the day of the race, I will try and not complain about silly little things  and think about someone who really has a problem, like just being able to breathe. Sometimes its better to not focus on a time or a place in a race but be grateful to physically be able to compete.

Sarah

My New Years resolutions are filled with fitness goals and new challenges, and 2018 is no exception! I plan to enter a fitness body competition, fine tune my diet as my needs are always changing as I age, and travel to more snowshoe races this winter. We love to race as a family and I’m proud that our 7 year old and twin 11 year olds can run a 5k snowshoe race no matter how difficult the course or how nasty the weather. It’s the perfect family day with exercise and well deserved treats after. Besides hot chocolate and pastries. Some races serve homemade soup! And I love the sound of “McMahan” being called to the podium 5 times.

sarah mcmahan family

Stephanie

Below are some of my goals for 2018:

1) Compete in US Skyrunning races:  I love mountain running and have found this to be my strength over the years.  I live in the mountains and do almost all of my training in the mountains, so this year I am more focused on racing to my strengths.  Skyrunning events take place at high altitude with high elevation gain.  In the past I’ve raced with no specific plan in mind, but this year I am really focused on racing challenging courses which get me really excited – not just choosing races for the sake of racing.  Doing mountain racing also allows me to really use snowshoeing in the winter to my advantage.  With snowshoeing, I can still get out on the trails in the winter and work on my uphill strength.

2) Complete the TransSelkirks Stage Race in Canada.  My absolute favorite format of racing is Stage Racing in the mountains  I have been lucky enough to compete in the TransRockies 6 Day Run twice, so I am really excited to head to Canada to the Canadian Rockies for their 5 day run.

3) Gain UTMB points to eventually compete in the CCC.  This is a race that covers challenging mountain terrain through France and Switzerland.  To gain entry, you must complete qualifying races worth certain point amounts.

4) Professionally, my husband and I just purchased a gym in Big Bear Lake, CA – one of my favorite places in the world!  I feel such a connection with the mountains and town there and it has been a dream of ours for years to purchase an existing gym there.  We plan to make the gym a big success!  I have a big goal to start a trail run and snowshoe series in Big Bear!

 

 

Staying Outside During “Back to School”

It’s that time of year again! New clothes, new pencils (or electronic pens and tablets), new backpacks. Some kids are excited, and some might be dreading, the inevitable back to school weeks.

For a lot of families, “Back to School” might also mean more time indoors. As school programs start to reduce, or maybe even cancel, gym and recess, it’s important to make sure your kids are continuing to learn outside the classroom. We at Atlas encourage year-round outdoor adventures, not just for your physical health, but also as exercise for the mind.

According to a study from The Child Mind Institute, “The average American child is said to spend 4 to 7 minutes a day in unstructured play outdoors, and over 7 hours a day in front of a screen”. This uptick in indoor-time even has a name: Nature Deficit Disorder.

Why is getting outside so important? Can’t kids learn just as well with their screens? The article lays it out for us:

  • It builds confidence. The way that kids play in nature has a lot less structure than most types of indoor play. There are infinite ways to interact with outdoor environments, from the backyard to the park to the local hiking trail or lake, and letting your child choose how he treats nature means he has the power to control his own actions.
  • It promotes creativity and imagination. This unstructured style of play also allows kids to interact meaningfully with their surroundings. They can think more freely, design their own activities, and approach the world in inventive ways.
  • It teaches responsibility. Living things die if mistreated or not taken care of properly, and entrusting a child to take care of the living parts of their environment means they’ll learn what happens when they forget to water a plant, or pull a flower out by its roots.
  • It provides different stimulation. Nature may seem less stimulating than your son’s violent video game, but in reality, it activates more senses—you can see, hear, smell, and touch outdoor environments.
  • It gets kids moving. Most ways of interacting with nature involve more exercise than sitting on the couch. Your kid doesn’t have to be joining the local soccer team or riding a bike through the park—even a walk will get her blood pumping. Not only is exercise good for kids’ bodies, but it seems to make them more focused, which is especially beneficial for kids with ADHD.
  • It makes them think. Nature creates a unique sense of wonder for kids that no other environment can provide. The phenomena that occur naturally in backyards and parks everyday make kids ask questions about the earth and the life that it supports.
  • It reduces stress and fatigue. According to the Attention Restoration Theory, urban environments require what’s called directed attention, which forces us to ignore distractions and exhausts our brains. In natural environments, we practice an effortless type of attention known as soft fascination that creates feelings of pleasure, not fatigue.

We get it, technology is a part of our everyday lives. But we encourage you to make a goal this fall and winter: to get out more or get out in a different way. Maybe this is the time to buy your kids some snowshoes. Maybe it’s getting them so cool new gear that gets them excited about being in the snow. What can we do to entertain our kids away from their screens? The Washington Trails Association has some great games you can print and bring on your hikes. Your kids will have fun, enjoy the outdoors, and YOU get more happy family time. Win win!

 

Atlas and the Winter Wildlands Alliance

KerryProflie

From the Winter Wildlands Alliance:

Dear Atlas Snow-Shoe Company,

SnowSchool is officially winding down for the year and we’ve put together this season-end report to update you on all the recent SnowSchool developments made possible by Atlas’ support this past year.

Program Scope and Impact

As we do at the end of every SnowSchool season, we’ve nearly completed our survey of SnowSchool sites to measure how many participants came through the program this winter. With surveys from most of our major sites in, we estimate that SnowSchool engaged over 33,000 participants across 65 active sites, with 54% of the students qualifying as underserved and 50% of the of kids never having been on snowshoes before! This winter SnowSchool engaged an additional 4,000 adult chaperones, parents, K-12 teachers and volunteer educators. A SnowSchool student had this to say about her experience:

“Dear SnowSchool- Thank you so much for taking us snowshoeing and telling us about wildlife, plus telling us about the water cycle. I told my brother about how fun it was and he can’t wat to go!” –Abbey, 4th Grade Student

Success Stories

Program Expansion: Every winter WWA brings SnowSchool to new communities across the country by working to establish new SnowSchool sites. By partnering with existing organizations WWA can provide the science curriculum, discount snowshoes, educational equipment, on-snow training, over-the-phone/email mentoring and fundraising events necessary to quickly launch a winter program to serve new populations of students. Our national expansion efforts were boosted this year by the first-ever SnowSchool film to appear in WWA’s Backcountry Film Festival. The film, SnowSchool Experiences, featured our Northern Idaho Flagship Site and provided audiences at 107 showings nationwide with a compelling illustration of the program. As a result of this additional exposure and our ongoing efforts, WWA added 8 new SnowSchool sites in the following locations: Idaho City ID, Fairplay CO, Mammoth Lakes CA, Livingston MT, Wenatchee WA, Leavenworth WA, Dillion CO and Plumas County CA. This was the most sites we’ve ever added in a year!

Helping Rural Kids Explore Public Lands: Many successful SnowSchool sites are located in nature centers, Nordic centers, national parks and ski resorts that engage thousands of kids from urban areas every winter. But in many rural and mountainous communities students don’t need to get on a bus and drive hours to a nature center to explore the wilds of winter– they have public land right out the front door of their school. Thus, to bring the SnowSchool experience to students in these rural communities WWA is actively working to develop a new “traveling SnowSchool” program model. The concept was piloted this winter with the US Forest Service at our new SnowSchool site in rural Idaho City. Snowshoes and volunteer leaders arrived at the school and classes of fourth graders headed out the door and onto National Forest land across the street! Look for updates on this project in the coming season as we work to connect all kids with nature and help them understand the importance of our nation’s public lands.

Connecting Students with Snow Science: The SnowSchool program is uniquely situated to help K-12 students explore connections between mountain snow, climate research and water science, topics that are particularly relevant in western states and communities where mountain snow provides approximately 80 percent of the water supply. To capitalize on this opportunity WWA forged a new collaboration in 2017 with the National Resource Conservation Service’s Snow Survey Program. Utilizing NRCS’s network of remote SnoTEL stations (which monitor mountain snow across the west) WWA created a new web-based science activity to follow-up the SnowSchool field trip. This “Snowpack Prediction Contest” enables kids all across the Western US to study decades of snowpack data in their local watershed, and transforms the SnowSchool experience from a one-day event into winter-long science project. Quantitative outcome data collected by WWA shows that underserved students make significant gains is science learning through participation. Fifty-five classrooms of students nationally participated in this project in its first year and WWA aims to expand in future seasons. By combining this innovative snow science curriculum with fun outdoor exploration, SnowSchool is creating for kids both an emotional connection to winter wildlands and greater understanding of the important ecological role of mountain snow.

galena creek snowschool

The Trail Ahead

With your support we aspire to continue our efforts to increase the number of SnowSchool sites nationally and enhance the overall experience for every student. We envision a thriving national program that will foster rich ecological literacy in our communities and introduce generations of kids to the wonders of snowshoe exploration.

Sincerely,

Kerry McClay, Ed.D.

National SnowSchool Director