Tag Archives: Exercise

Prepare for National Trails Day

backcountry-avalanche-safety-snowshoers-940x564Looking to get out on snow while you still can? In the Trails.com Snowshoeing section you will find everything from easy snowshoe trails to overnight backcountry snowshoeing and winter camping trips. They have winter trails everywhere from sno-parks and winter playgrounds to remote backcountry lakes, canyons, and mountain peaks – something for snowshoers and “winter hikers” of all abilities and experience levels. Each snowshoeing trip is a complete chapter from a snowshoeing guidebook and includes a detailed trail map, driving directions to the trailhead, and a clear description of the route, all produced by well-known outdoor guidebook publishers. Every snowshoe route is linked to USGS topographic maps from the trail overview page, and many also offer a host of additional features like photos, regional locator maps, and avalanche danger assessments. To find a great snow trail for you, just click on the link. Then browse by selecting a specific region or “Top Trail” from the list, or by simply clicking on the interactive state map. Get out, enjoy the trails, and tag us in your photos!

BCA + Atlas Winter Giveaway

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We’ve teamed up with Backcountry Access (BCA) to give away a pair of Atlas Endeavor backcountry snowshoes and BCA Scepter adjustable ski poles. Make your next snowy adventure the best one yet! This prize has a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $320 but you can enter today and take home this prize for free!

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BCA + Atlas Winter Giveaway - Enter Now!

New registrations received by March 10, 2017 will be eligible to win. Winner will be selected by March 15, 2017 and contacted by email and phone by March 31, 2017. All fields must be completed for valid contest entry. Complete contest rules are available here.

About BCA

The “Access” in Backcountry Access means a lot more than just getting after it in the mountains. Since 1994, BCA avalanche safety gear has been designed to make backcountry riding and snow safety more accessible: more widely available, affordable and easy-to-use. The “A” in access also stands for access for all backcountry users, no matter what the means of travel. BCA dedicates discretionary spending towards promoting avalanche education, not restricting access to the backcountry. For more information or just to get stoked, visit backcountryaccess.com.

Winter Cross-Training

Winter Cross Training

What do you know about klister, gaiters, depth hoar, and wet butt syndrome? More often than not, northern athletes spend their winters doing a combination of snowshoeing and Nordic skiing and are all too familiar with the terms.

As one of the most rapidly growing winter activities, snowshoeing has been driven by the development of new, lighter, and smaller snowshoes that allow runners to maintain a more normal gait. Older wooden shoes — the kind you see hanging up on lodge walls — forced snowshoers to waddle to avoid stomping their shoes into each other. Now, however, with smaller asymmetric frames, runners on snowshoes are able to maintain a sub-six pace on snow.

Manufacturers like Atlas Snow-Shoe Company have designed a full line of snowshoes that range in size and weight, including smaller shoes for light hiking or running. Cognizant of the growing popularity of the sport, companies have sought to introduce snowshoe-compatible multi-sport winter footwear for exercising in the cold and wet.

A key figure in the engineering of the new breed of sleek snowshoes is Bill Perkins, a.k.a. “Snowshoe Willie,” who helped make Leadville, Colorado a snowshoe capital of the U.S. Perkins, who has been snowshoeing for more than twenty years, designed one of the earliest models of racing shoes in 1988 using aluminum tubing out of frustration with the shoes that had been available to him.

The synergy between running and snowshoeing also worked for Wayne Nicoll, an avid snowshoer in New Hampshire who touted “one training the other.” Nicoll had snowshoed for most of his life but didn’t race until he saw there were 60+ age categories in various New England races.

Beginning snowshoers who are in good running shape may want to start by hiking for their first time out. One training method is to track a one- to three-mile loop and do repeats, going faster each time. The snow will get packed down and you may feel comfortable running before long. Another technique is to work in short blasts of speed, especially on short climbs and descents. Running downhill in fresh powder is a real treat.

-Adam Chase (Atlas Team Captain)