Tag Archives: snowshoers

Hiking with Elektra

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You might know of the many different iterations of Elektra (or Electra depending on your mythology of preference): Marvel super hero, Sophacles’ heroine, Freudian complex. As one of the most popular mythological (and comic book) characters, Elektra is recognized as a strong and resilient female character.

So it’s no wonder that, in the early 2000’s, Atlas engineers decided to build a line of female-specific snowshoes, and name it after her. (Not to mention the earlier Electra was one of the seven daughters of the Titan Atlas, but enough with the history lessons!)

When we talk about our female-specific snowshoes, we don’t just mean a change in color. The reason we don’t call the line “Atlas Women’s Snowshoes” is because it is, physically, a different shoe from the men’s, and therefore deserved its own name and design.

Men's Montane
Men’s Montane
Elektra Montane
Elektra Montane

Elektra snowshoes are designed with a woman’s anatomy in mind. While studying the way women move, researchers note that women often have a narrower gait than men. Therefore, we needed to make snowshoes that allowed for that narrower step, specifically in the tail of the shoe (see our comparison above). When women are forced to walk in wider snowshoes, they’re going to expend more energy (try walking wider than is natural to you for a while, you’ll probably tire a lot faster). Therefore, a narrower shoe isn’t just necessary because of the weight factor, it actually helps the wearer save energy.

With snow starting to fall, now is the time to get yourself on the right snowshoes, built for you. Check out our Elektra line and see if it makes a difference on your hikes.

 

Meet The Team

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We here at Atlas Snow-Shoe Company feel incredibly lucky to have people who love our product. Our engineers spend years working on perfecting something as large as a crampon and as small as a buckle, and it’s pretty cool to see our fans out in the real world using the snowshoes to tackle a mountain, a race, or a family hike.

The benefit and the drawback of outdoor adventuring is that it’s often done in less-populated, quiet, areas. We want to show how much fun everyone is having on their snowshoes, but it’s hard sometimes! That’s where our ambassadors come in.

We are happy to announce our 2017/2018 Atlas Athlete Team. We received a LOT of applications to join this adventure and racing team. Our ambassadors reach far beyond this group; we welcome everyone to continue getting out there and sharing your adventures with us by tagging us on social @atlassnowshoes.

The Atlas Team represents people of all ages, geographic areas, skill levels, and they all have different goals for the next winter. Follow them on our blog, and on our social (@atlassnowshoes), to see where their snowshoes will take them.

Meet the Team

Adventure On Atlas Fans!

Which Shoe For Someone New?

 

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By Jill Nazeer, Atlas Marketing Specialist

Hello out there in snowshoe land. You don’t know me. I’m the marketing specialist for Atlas Snowshoes. I have the best job ever—getting to help people explore the outdoors. I have a secret to admit though… I’m from a large city where snowshoeing was something you did once a year, on vacation, which inevitably was a 2-hour drive in any direction.

When I came to work here I immersed myself in snowshoes, sitting with our engineers for hours hearing about recreational crampons and Nytex decking. I thought, “Wow, this technology is awesome!” (which it is). Next thought was, “But how does this translate to an average Joe or Jane?” As much as we wish we could build holograms of our engineers and send them out to the public, we don’t have the ability (yet).

If you’re an experienced snowshoer or someone completely new, do you REALLY know the meaning of all of these trademarked technological names? How would you find the shoe for you?

The only way to solve the dilemma was to take it to the hills! We’re honored to be located in Seattle, Wash., where snow and mountains are only a short drive away. So I packed the car with every snowshoe that would fit (including some non-Atlas shoes, to be fair to everyone), picked up our Sales Manager and a new-to-snowshoeing (read: unbiased) friend, and we trucked out to Snoqualmie Pass.

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And so we walked. We walked up, we walked down, we walked flats, we walked hills, we walked through rain and snow (because…Seattle) and we compared. Want to know what we found out? Our snowshoes are pretty darn awesome. It was really hard to determine which we liked more based on comfort, so we had to get picky.

Here is the process we recommend as you consider a snowshoe:

1) Conditions

Our engineers (like I said, they’re really smart) have determined the perfect conditions for every snowshoe. There are categories of shoes called Backcountry, Peak Series, and Trail Walking. The category you pick means you’ll have the right crampon (traction) for your activity.

Q) But what does that mean?
A) In Laymen’s terms:

  • Backcountry = You’re hiking to the top of a summit or on very technical terrain and need something light, durable, and with really solid traction.
  • Peak = You are to a—you guessed it—peak. Still technical, but you don’t necessarily need death-grip levels of traction.
  • Trail = You need shoes that will get you around on flats or moderate hills.

Once we picked the right category of shoe, we looked at what was within that category. The choices might seem overwhelming, but stick with us here.

2) Bindings

Atlas has several kinds of bindings with fancy names, but really you can see the difference by looking at them. Do you like a few fabric straps? Would you prefer only two straps with a single pull cord? How about a Boa closure?

Q) What’s Boa?
A) You may have seen their products in other places like cycling shoes, golf shoes, snowboard boots, or helmets. Check them out here: https://www.theboasystem.com/

3) Suspension

Atlas has a few names for suspension abbreviated with SLS and LRS, but really they might as well be titled “more snowflip” and “less snowflip”.

Q) What’s snowflip??
A) Don’t worry, I got you. Snowflip is how much snow the shoe digs up and flips back at you as you walk. Ever walked through a lot of mud and realized it was all over the back of your legs later? Snowflip my friends. Some people don’t notice this at all, but some are bothered by it. It’s all about personal choice.

Q) Wouldn’t I just always pick less snowflip?
A) Not necessarily. There are other differences between SLS and LRS. SLS lets the crampon sink deeper into the snow, so it absorbs impact and is easier for you to walk on technical terrain. LRS is great for mellow terrain since it allows for a more natural stride.

4) Size

Snowshoe sizing has little to do with your shoe size, or height, or gender. It’s really all about load, aka how much weight the snowshoes will be carrying. And not just your weight, but the weight of your pack, or snowboard, or picnic basket lunch, or whatever you’re carrying as you walk on those shoes

5) Color

JUST KIDDING, YOU SHOULDN’T BUY ANY TECHNICAL SHOES BASED ON COLOR! Don’t worry, though, all of our colors are pretty great.

In the end, we all liked different shoes for different reasons. And that’d be the same for you as well. You might love a certain binding because it’s easiest to use, or you know you’re walking to the top of Mt Baker and need something technical, or you want to buy a gift for Granny so she can walk to the end of her driveway to get the mail. It’s always best to go into a shop, or attend a demo event, and look at the shoes, touch them, play with them, and ask the employees for help if you need it. But I hope this helps decipher some of the lingo. And hey…don’t you feel just a little bit smarter now?

Need help finding a local dealer? Here you go! http://en-us.atlassnowshoe.com/dealers

Have shoes but don’t know where to go now? We’ve got your back. http://snowshoes.com/

Q) Wait, I’ve read to the end and you haven’t told me which snowshoes you liked best?!
A) Nope, sorry. That’s like asking us to pick our favorite child. It really just depends on the day. Happy snowshoe hunting!

Atlas and the Winter Wildlands Alliance

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From the Winter Wildlands Alliance:

Dear Atlas Snow-Shoe Company,

SnowSchool is officially winding down for the year and we’ve put together this season-end report to update you on all the recent SnowSchool developments made possible by Atlas’ support this past year.

Program Scope and Impact

As we do at the end of every SnowSchool season, we’ve nearly completed our survey of SnowSchool sites to measure how many participants came through the program this winter. With surveys from most of our major sites in, we estimate that SnowSchool engaged over 33,000 participants across 65 active sites, with 54% of the students qualifying as underserved and 50% of the of kids never having been on snowshoes before! This winter SnowSchool engaged an additional 4,000 adult chaperones, parents, K-12 teachers and volunteer educators. A SnowSchool student had this to say about her experience:

“Dear SnowSchool- Thank you so much for taking us snowshoeing and telling us about wildlife, plus telling us about the water cycle. I told my brother about how fun it was and he can’t wat to go!” –Abbey, 4th Grade Student

Success Stories

Program Expansion: Every winter WWA brings SnowSchool to new communities across the country by working to establish new SnowSchool sites. By partnering with existing organizations WWA can provide the science curriculum, discount snowshoes, educational equipment, on-snow training, over-the-phone/email mentoring and fundraising events necessary to quickly launch a winter program to serve new populations of students. Our national expansion efforts were boosted this year by the first-ever SnowSchool film to appear in WWA’s Backcountry Film Festival. The film, SnowSchool Experiences, featured our Northern Idaho Flagship Site and provided audiences at 107 showings nationwide with a compelling illustration of the program. As a result of this additional exposure and our ongoing efforts, WWA added 8 new SnowSchool sites in the following locations: Idaho City ID, Fairplay CO, Mammoth Lakes CA, Livingston MT, Wenatchee WA, Leavenworth WA, Dillion CO and Plumas County CA. This was the most sites we’ve ever added in a year!

Helping Rural Kids Explore Public Lands: Many successful SnowSchool sites are located in nature centers, Nordic centers, national parks and ski resorts that engage thousands of kids from urban areas every winter. But in many rural and mountainous communities students don’t need to get on a bus and drive hours to a nature center to explore the wilds of winter– they have public land right out the front door of their school. Thus, to bring the SnowSchool experience to students in these rural communities WWA is actively working to develop a new “traveling SnowSchool” program model. The concept was piloted this winter with the US Forest Service at our new SnowSchool site in rural Idaho City. Snowshoes and volunteer leaders arrived at the school and classes of fourth graders headed out the door and onto National Forest land across the street! Look for updates on this project in the coming season as we work to connect all kids with nature and help them understand the importance of our nation’s public lands.

Connecting Students with Snow Science: The SnowSchool program is uniquely situated to help K-12 students explore connections between mountain snow, climate research and water science, topics that are particularly relevant in western states and communities where mountain snow provides approximately 80 percent of the water supply. To capitalize on this opportunity WWA forged a new collaboration in 2017 with the National Resource Conservation Service’s Snow Survey Program. Utilizing NRCS’s network of remote SnoTEL stations (which monitor mountain snow across the west) WWA created a new web-based science activity to follow-up the SnowSchool field trip. This “Snowpack Prediction Contest” enables kids all across the Western US to study decades of snowpack data in their local watershed, and transforms the SnowSchool experience from a one-day event into winter-long science project. Quantitative outcome data collected by WWA shows that underserved students make significant gains is science learning through participation. Fifty-five classrooms of students nationally participated in this project in its first year and WWA aims to expand in future seasons. By combining this innovative snow science curriculum with fun outdoor exploration, SnowSchool is creating for kids both an emotional connection to winter wildlands and greater understanding of the important ecological role of mountain snow.

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The Trail Ahead

With your support we aspire to continue our efforts to increase the number of SnowSchool sites nationally and enhance the overall experience for every student. We envision a thriving national program that will foster rich ecological literacy in our communities and introduce generations of kids to the wonders of snowshoe exploration.

Sincerely,

Kerry McClay, Ed.D.

National SnowSchool Director

 

 

Prepare for National Trails Day

backcountry-avalanche-safety-snowshoers-940x564Looking to get out on snow while you still can? In the Trails.com Snowshoeing section you will find everything from easy snowshoe trails to overnight backcountry snowshoeing and winter camping trips. They have winter trails everywhere from sno-parks and winter playgrounds to remote backcountry lakes, canyons, and mountain peaks – something for snowshoers and “winter hikers” of all abilities and experience levels. Each snowshoeing trip is a complete chapter from a snowshoeing guidebook and includes a detailed trail map, driving directions to the trailhead, and a clear description of the route, all produced by well-known outdoor guidebook publishers. Every snowshoe route is linked to USGS topographic maps from the trail overview page, and many also offer a host of additional features like photos, regional locator maps, and avalanche danger assessments. To find a great snow trail for you, just click on the link. Then browse by selecting a specific region or “Top Trail” from the list, or by simply clicking on the interactive state map. Get out, enjoy the trails, and tag us in your photos!

Backcountry Avalanche Safety for Snowshoers

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Spring brings the opportunity to snowshoe higher and deeper into the backcountry.  It’s also a time of high avalanche activity from wet snow and persistent slab slides.  Now is a great time to have a look at late season snow conditions and be reminded of the BCA’s five backcountry basics and avalanche safety for snowshoers.

  1. Get the Gear. Before you head into the backcountry, get the avalanche safety gear you need, at minimum a beacon, probe and shovel.  Carry all required backcountry safety gear, on your body, all the time to help you find a buried partner and be found yourself. Consider two-way radios to communicate should your group get separated, as well as navigation and first aid equipment.
  2. Get the Training. Take an avalanche course to learn the backcountry basics, including how to use your avalanche transceiver, probe and shovel in event an avalanche rescue is necessary.
  3. Get the Forecast. Check your local avalanche center website for weather and avalanche advisories.
  4. Get the Picture. Research and inspect your route, look for signs of recent avalanche activity, identify and avoid dangerous terrain, communicate with your group and always make a plan ‘B’ with alternate terrain options.
  5. Get out of Harm’s Way. Limit your snowshoe group’s exposure to backcountry hazards and dangerous terrain.

Backcountry Access has some great educational avalanche avoidance videos and avalanche rescue videos that every backcountry snowshoer should watch.

Atlas Backcountry Access Spring Giveaway

To entice our snowshoe community to travel safely in the backcountry, Atlas Snow-shoes and BCA invite you to enter our spring giveaway contest!

[ ENTER CONTEST HERE ]

Enter for a chance to win your choice of a set of Atlas Montane or Atlas Endeavor snowshoes, plus a Backcountry Access DTS avalanche rescue package, complete with avalanche beacon, probe & shovel. Prize package MSRP value $530. Enter by Wednesday, April 12, 2017.

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New registrations received by 11:59 PM MTN on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 will be eligible to win, US and Canada only. Winner will be selected and contacted by April 30, 2017. All fields must be completed for valid contest entry. You agree to opt-in and to receive Backcountry Access and Atlas Snow-shoes email by entering this contest. Company reserves the right to substitute prizes of similar value based on availability. See contest rules.

About BCA

The “Access” in Backcountry Access means a lot more than just getting after it in the mountains. Since 1994, BCA avalanche safety gear has been designed to make backcountry riding and snow safety more accessible: more widely available, affordable and easy-to-use. The “A” in access also stands for access for all backcountry users, no matter what the means of travel. BCA dedicates discretionary spending towards promoting avalanche education, not restricting access to the backcountry. For more information or just to get stoked, visit backcountryaccess.com.